The Henry Harold Harrison Family

Ancestral Towns and Villages

Village of Lancashire

Aberdeen

Place where Elizabeth Ormishaw (aka Betty Ball) died in 1863. Aberdeen was then an area of Blackrod just west of Blundell House and can be clearly seen on the 1850s era ordinance survey map. Today Aberdeen is the name of a farm in that same location. It is possible, if not likely, that Elizabeth died at her home in Blundles Fold, and that this was considered to be in the area called Aberdeen at the time.

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Adlington

In the 19th century Adlington was a small village located about 8km north-northeast of Wigan. Today it is a town and parish on Bolton Road. John Harrison (b. 1786) and Jemima Whittle moved to Adlington from Coppull sometime between 1824 and 1833. Their youngest son, Henry, was born in Adlington in 1833 and they were in Adlington at the time of the 1841 census. Adlington was the birthplace of all of the children of John Harrison (b. 1813) and Elizabeth Ormandy for whom we have that information, beginning with Joseph Harrison (b. 1835). John and Elizabeth lived in Adlington for the first half of their married life. John was the innkeeper at the Waggon and Horses Inn in Adlington for a number of years.

Many years later, in 1871, John Jones and Elizabeth Ball settled in Adlington.

Christ Church in Adlington was founded in 1839 and closed in 1975. We have not yet investigated whether John and Elizabeth were members of this parish.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Adlington/

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Barton

Today a township and village, in the 19th century Barton was a rural area just north of Broughton and perhaps 35km due north of Wigan. Henry and Elizabeth Barton settled at Crosses Farm in Barton where they raised their family during the middle part of the 19th century. It seems likely that Henry Barton may have had family ties to the township that bore his name, but we have not yet made this link.

St. Lawrence church in Barton was founded before 1577. We have not yet investigated the parish records for St. Lawrence.

Today Barton is a small village straddling Garstang Road (the A6) north of Broughton in a predominantly rural area. The remains of an ancient mill can be seen along Barton Lane, and further along is Barton’s Cross opposite Crosses Farm. This is perhaps ths land farmed by Henry Barton (b. 1809) in the 1840s. (See Crosses)

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Barton/

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Blackrod

An area, including a village, located about 5km northeast of Wigan town centre straddling Pool Green Road. Blackrod borders Haigh to the east. Henry and Betty Ball and Joseph and Ellen Harrison resided at Blundles Fold in Blackrod in 1861. Henry Harrison was born in Blackrod in 1860. His great-grandparents, Henry Ball and Elizabeth Ormishaw, both died in Blackrod in 1863. John Jones who married Elizabeth Ball (b. 1815) was from Blackrod.

Blackrod has an ancient church, St. Katherine, founded before 1338. However the parish registers are not yet indexed. We have not found any lasting family ties to Blackrod or the parish.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Blackrod/

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Broughton

Broughton is a village located about 30km north of Wigan, beyond Preston. Broughton was the place of residence of Betty Swarbrick in May 1838 according to her marriage certificate. Her son Edward’s birth certificate indicates that he was born “at Broughton.” Henry and Betty were, therefore, probably still living in Broughton in Sept 1839.

St. John the Baptist Anglican church is located on the main north-south road through Broughton. It is an ancient church founded before 1112. Early records refer to this church as “the Parochial Chapelry of Broughton” suggesting that it was a chapel in Preston parish. Henry Barton and Elizabeth Swarbrick were married here. A walk through the churchyard has not turned up any evident family burial sites.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Broughton/

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Cabus

In the 19th century Cabus was a rural area just north of Garstang, about 20km north of Preston. Matthew and Dorothy Swarbrick lived and farmed in Cabus from 1814 through 1818 per the baptismal records of several of their children including Betty Swarbrick in 1818. We believe Dorothy’s parents, Robert Chippindale and Nancy Gardner, also spent their life in the Cabus area.

The nearest ancient church is St. Thomas in Garstang founded in 1337. However the Swarbrick–Chippendale families baptized their children at St. Helen’s or at St. Michael on Wyre. We have not yet investigated the parish records for St. Thomas.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Cabus/

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Chorley

Chorley is a town situated about 10km north of Wigan, 3km north of Adlington. Jemima Whittle lived here when she married John Harrison (b. 1786) in 1812 at St. Lawrence church in Chorley. We have not yet investigated the earlier history of the Whittle family which may have resided in Chorley for some time.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Chorley/

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Coppull

Coppull is an area about 10km north of Wigan and a few km north of Standish. The Harrison branch of the family hailed from Coppull for the better part of a century. John Harrison (b. 1746) and Alice Brimeley lived in Coppull from about 1774 and most of their children were born there, beginning with Betty in 1775, through Alice in 1789 and including John Harrison born in 1786. Baptismal records for the children of John Harrison (b. 1786) and Jemima Whittle show that they lived in Coppull from the time of their marriage in 1812 until they moved to Adlington sometime between 1824 and 1833. A century later Margaret Harrison (“Aunt Maggie”) and her family lived much of their life at 30 Coppull Moor Lane in Coppull.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Coppull/

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Dalton

A small township in Wigan parish on the northern outskirts of Skelmersdale where Henry Ball (b. 1715) spent most of his adult life.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/DaltonW/

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Garstang

A town on the River Wyre located about 20km north of Preston. The Swarbrick and Chippendale families lived near Garstang and many of their offspring were baptized there at St. Helen’s church.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Garstang/

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Haigh

Haigh is an area and a village 4km northeast of Wigan town centre. The central feature of Haigh is an estate, now Haigh County Park and Haigh Hall, which was the former seat of the Earls of Crawford and Balcarres. Henry and Betty Ball settled at Heywoods Farm in the northern part of Haigh during the first half of the 19th century. Many of their younger children were born and raised there. It was there that their granddaughter Ellen Ball met her future husband, Joseph Harrison. See also Heywoods.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Haigh/

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Heath Charnock

The area where John Harrison (b. 1813) and Elizabeth Ormandy lived when son William was born in 1838. Although William actually gave his place of birth as nearby Adlington, his birth registration gives the family’s address as Heath Charnock. The Harrison family left Heath Charnock and was living in Adlington by 1840 when Alice was born.

Heath Charnock appears on the early ordinance survey maps as part of Rivington lying between Adlington to the south and Chorley to the north. The LL Canal forms the west border. Today it is the site of the Chorley Golf Club.

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Ince-in-Makerfield (Ince)

Ince is a town bordering Wigan on the south and southeast side of the Leeds-Liverpool Canal. Edward Barton was residing in Ince when he was married in 1861. Edward Harrison and his family lived in Ince for a period of time after their marriage. Nellie Harrison was residing in Ince when she died in 1940. The Wigan Cemetery and Crematorium, where many of Henry Harold’s family members are buried, is located in Ince.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/InceinMakerfield/

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Langtree

An area in Standish township where Ellen Ball’s uncles, Edward and John Ball, lived with their families in adjacent farms at the time of the 1841 census. John Ball (b. 1806) and Margaret Harrison resided in Langtree in September 1849 when their daughter Mary was born.

Standish is also known as “Standish and Langtree” and “Standish cum Langtree.”

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Nether Wyresdale

A township in Garstang parish on the River Wyre about 6km north of Garstang near Cabus. Betty Swarbrick went to Nether Wyresdale with her younger children when her husband Henry Barton died or became otherwise separated from his family, probably around 1855. Betty’s sister, Nancy Swarbrick (aka Nancy Eccles) was living there, widowed. Nether Wyersdale is about 2km north of Cabus, Betty’s birthplace. The villages of Scorton and Lower Dolphinholme are in the present day parish of Nether Wyersdale.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/NetherWyresdale/

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Ormskirk

A town, township, and parish located 17km west of Wigan. Elizabeth Ormishaw was born in Ormskirk in 1784, presumably at the home of her parents William and Ellen.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Ormskirk/

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Preston

A town, township, and parish in central Lancashire located 24km north of Wigan. Henry Barton (b. 1809) was living in Preston when his daughter, Dorothy Ann, died in 1853.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Preston/

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Rainford

An area and village located 11km west-southwest of Wigan and 5km due south of Skelmersdale. Ellen Hewet was born to Daniel Hewet and Mary in Rainford in 1746. She was baptized at the Independent Church, aka Protestant Dissenters.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Rainford/

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Scorton

See Nether Wyresdale

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Shevington

An area in Standish Parish located 3km southwest of Standish on the River Douglas. Thomas Winnard and his wife Elizabeth lived in Shevington from 1719 or earlier until 1735. Jane Winnard was born there in 1719 and her brother John in 1723. According to the baptismal record of Elizabeth Ball, Henry Ball and his family were farming in Shevington in 1815. (Some later records give Elizabeth’s birthplace as Standish.)

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Shevington/

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Skelmersdale

In the mid-19th century Skelmersdale was a rural area located 10km west of Wigan on the River Tawd. Today it is also a village. John Barton and his wife Anne lived in Skelmersdale in 1812 when daughter Ellen Barton was born. Ellen Barton gave birth to her first four children in Skelmersdale – Thomas Barton in 1835, Anne Barton in 1843, John Barton in 1843, and Evan Mawdsley in 1845. Residence of Henry Mawdsley in 1841 when he was enumerated at Sefton’s, the home of his father Evan. Today there is no trace of the 19th century family homes in Skelmersdale, Sefton’s, and Grimshaw. A large housing estate sits on the land that was once farmed by Mawdsleys and Bartons.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Skelmersdale/ and the Skelmersdale Heritage Society.

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Standish

Standish is an area and a village a few km north of Wigan town centre. It includes Langtree to the west and Standish Lower Ground to the south. Many of our ancestors lived in Standish and many are buried in St. Wilfrid’s churchyard there. The Harrison family seems to have originated from nearby Coppull, however John Harrison was a farmer in Standish at the time of his marriage to Jemima Whittle in 1812. Henry Ball and Betty Ormishaw settled in Standish, probably for about 20 years from about 1805. As Standish was not a very big place (pop. 2,000 in 1821) it is almost certain that John Harrison and Henry Ball were acquainted many years before their grandchildren married.

Several children of Henry and Betty were born in Standish, from John (1806) to Daniel (1813). A number of Henry and Betty’s sons also settled in Standish or Standish Lower Ground in the middle of the 19th century (Edward, John, Henry, Daniel) and a large number of the next generation Ball family were therefore also born in Standish. Henry Ball (b. 1811) was the innkeeper of the Royal Oak Inn in Standish Lower Ground in the mid-19th century.

Many years later, around 1890, Joseph Harrison and his son Edward both got jobs working for (and living at) the Wigan municipal waterworks in Standish. The waterworks established a pumping station at the reservoir at Boar’s Head, Standish and Joseph and Edward both worked there. Edward Harrison was living at the pumping station when he died of rabies in 1894. His wife Martha also died there that year and Joseph, by then a widow, moved to Boar’s Head to care for Edward’s orphaned children.

This website provides a good description of Standish. If you find the 1869 Standish directory on this site you will find Daniel Ball is listed as a shoemaker in Standish in 1869 and his brother Henry is listed as the proprietor of the Royal Oak Inn.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Standish/

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Upholland

Upholland is an area of Wigan located about 4km west of Wigan town centre, halfway to Skelmersdale.

We can trace our ancestry in Upholland back to the 17th century. Five generations of Balls came from Upholland alternately named Edward–Henry–Edward–Henry–Edward. They were all farmers working the land on the outskirts of Wigan and doubtless selling their produce in Wigan marketplace. Elizabeth Ormishaw, wife of Henry (b. 1779) was also from Upholland although we have not yet been able to trace her origins. The eldest children of Henry and Elizabeth were also born and baptized in Upholland, although they grew up and eventually settled in Standish, some 6km to the northeast.

The many generations of Balls were members of the parish of St. Thomas the Martyr Anglican church in Upholland; many were baptized at the church. We have not yet looked for burial sites in St. Thomas churchyard but there are certainly family members buried there. In addition to the Ball family we believe the Ellen Barton side of the family may have originated in Upholland; further research is needed on the background of Ellen’s grandfather, John Barton.

Today, Upholland is a west-Wigan neighbourhood along the A557 road to Skelmersdale, essentially indistinguishable from the rest urban Wigan.

See also http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Upholland/

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