The Henry Harold Harrison Family

Henry Harold Harrison’s paternal aunt

Elizabeth Harrison (1858–1946)
aka Elizabeth Whitfield

Parents:
Joseph Harrison
(c. 1835–1908)
Ellen Ball
(1832–1893)
Siblings:
Edward Harrison
(c. 1855–1894)
Henry Harrison
(1860–1937)
Maria Ormandy Harrison
(c. 1863–1897)
Jemima Harrison
(1865–?)
Ellen Harrison
(1867–?)
Alice Harrison
(1870–?)
Margaret Harrison
(1875–1943)
Married:
Francis Whitfield
(c. 1845–1931)
Children:
Ellen Whitfield
(1896–?)
Doris Whitfield
(1900–1990)

Biography

Elizabeth Harrison was the first daughter born to Joseph Harrison (b. 1835) and Ellen Ball (b. 1832). She was born on 17 May 1858 in Blundles Fold, Blackrod which was a bit of a family enclave at the time. Her daddy worked in a local coal mine. She was enumerated at Blundles Fold in the 1861 census.

When Elizabeth was six or seven years old her family moved to Wigan. At first they lived on Wood Street, and then they moved to Byrom Street and Pool Street in Poolstock where Elizabeth grew up. Like most girls at that time and place, Elizabeth probably had little or no formal education. She almost certainly spent her childhood helping her mother look after the home and her six younger brothers and sisters. The 1871 census provides a snapshot of Elizabeth, age 12, living on Byrom Street. Although she was enumerated as a “scholar” this was a pro forma entry for all pre-teen children.

Like most children of her time, Elizabeth was sent out to work at one of the Poolstock textile mills around the age of 13. This was hard work, ten to twelve hours a day, six days a week, in a hot, humid, dust-filled mill for very little money. The least that can be said was that she had company, for all of her younger sisters – Maria, Jemima, Ellen, Alice and Margaret, followed in her footsteps. Elizabeth spent almost 25 years of her life, day in and day out, in this job. The 1881 census captured Elizabeth at age 22 living on Pool Street, Poolstock employed as a “weaver in a cotton mill” along with those of her sisters who were old enough to work. Eight family members lived in a few hundred square feet and Elizabeth certainly shared a room, if not a bed, with several of her sisters. Ten years later the 1891 census captured Elizabeth at age 32 living on Poolstock Lane, employed as a “weaver in a cotton mill” along with all of her sisters. This house was no bigger and the six sisters certainly shared rooms and beds.

None of the six Harrison girls married while their mother was alive. This was quite unusual for the time. Most women of that era married and left the family home around the age of 25. All of the Harrison girls stayed with their parents until Ellen Ball died in December 1893, by which time four of the six daughters were older than 25. It was only after Ellen’s death that some of them began to “leave the nest” and get married. At least two died spinsters. We can only speculate why this would be the case. One explanation would be that Ellen was an invalid requiring the care of her daughters. On the other hand it is likely that the Harrison family, with Joseph and his six daughters employed and living in the same house for many years, had the benefit of an above-average family income for the time.

On 16 April 1895 Elizabeth Harrison married Francis Whitfield at St. James Church in Poolstock. Elizabeth was just shy of her 38th birthday (although she recorded her age as 36!). Francis was a 50 year old widower employed as a railway guard, living at 10 Corporation Street in Poolstock. Francis was originally from Hold, near Widnes. Elizabeth was Francis’ third wife. He had been widowed twice, most recently in 1891 when his second wife, Ellen Talbot, died. Francis had one daughter, Sarah, by his marriage to Ellen. Sarah would have been ten or eleven years old when her father married Elizabeth. Elizabeth moved into the house at 10 Corporation Street with Francis and Sarah.

Francis and Elizabeth had at least two daughters. Their first daughter Ellen was born at 10 Corporation Street in August 1896. Their second daughter, Doris, was born on Darlington Street East in February 1900.

At the time of the 1901 census, Elizabeth was 42 years old. She was living on Darlington Street East near the centre of Wigan. Her husband Francis at age 56 was still employed as a railway guard. Her stepdaughter Sarah, age 16, was employed in a cotton mill. Elizabeth was at home caring for her daughters Ellen and Doris, ages 4 and 1. Sometime after this date the family moved from Darlington Street back to Poolstock. We know something about Elizabeth’s life in Poolstock during the time she was married to Francis and raising her daughters. This information comes from verses written by her daughter, Doris, and compiled by Doris many years later. Elizabeth was a “stay-at-home” mother as were most married women at that time and place. She was a caring mother who made sure her children were well fed and clothed. She was active in her local church and community as a member of the Mother’s Union, helping to organize some of their programs. She helped take care of the “old and sick and poor” members of her community, making them pancakes for instance, on Shrove Tuesday. Elizabeth was also a loyalist – the British royal family mattered to her and her family. And we know that Francis and Elizabeth took annual vacations, leaving Doris behind with Elizabeth’s sister Jemima Woods. Although we don’t know where the vacations were spent, Blackpool would be a good bet!

At the time of the 1911 census the Whitfield family was living at 24 Byron Street in Poolstock. By this time Francis had retired as a railway guard and the family were earning their living as “fish & chip potato dealers” working from their home. Francis was the dealer and Elizabeth and daughter Sarah are listed as his “assistants.” We infer that the business probably involved cutting up potatoes and selling them on to local fish & chip vendors. Daughter Ellen was employed as a dressmaker’s apprentice and Doris was still in school.

By the late 1920s the Whitfield family had moved to 70 Pool Street in Wigan. Elizabeth’s step daughter, Sarah, certainly married sometime during this period although we do not yet have the record. One of Doris’s poems references Sarah’s betrothal and we know her married name was Calland. Daughter Doris married John Darbyshire in 1929. Daughter Ellen married Cranley Britnell in 1934 (after Francis’ death) and moved to Blackpool.

Francis Whitfield died at the family home at 70 Pool Street, Wigan, on 7 December 1931, leaving Elizabeth widowed for the remaining years of her life. Sometime thereafter Elizabeth moved to Ingleway Avenue in Blackpool to live with Ellen and Cranley. Elizabeth died on Ingleway Avenue on 6 February 1946. Both Francis and Doris are buried in a family plot at Wigan and Ince Cemetery in Wigan.


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